Author: Jessica Diaz

Do you shower or bathe daily? If you do, you’re not alone. Approximately two-thirds of Americans shower daily. In Australia it’s over 80%. But in China, about half of people report bathing only twice a week. In the US, the daily shower tends to start around puberty and becomes lifelong. But have you ever stopped to ask yourself why? Perhaps your answer is: “because it’s healthier than showering less often.” Think again. For many — perhaps most — the daily shower is more about habit and societal norms than health. Perhaps that’s why the frequency of bathing or showering varies so much from country to country.

Are there reasons to shower every day?

Besides considering it healthier, people may choose to shower daily for a number of reasons, including:
  • concerns about body odor
  • help waking up
  • a morning routine that includes working out.
Each of these has merit, especially considering that personal or work relationships can be jeopardized by complaints about body odor or personal hygiene. But what is considered acceptable in this regard varies from culture to culture. And some (perhaps a lot) of what we do when it comes to cleaning habits is influenced heavily by marketing. Ever notice that directions on shampoo bottles often say “lather, rinse, repeat”? There is no compelling reason to wash your hair twice with each shower, but it does sell more shampoo if everyone follows these directions. When it comes to concerns about health, however, it’s not at all clear that a daily shower accomplishes much. In fact, a daily shower may even be bad for your health.

What are the health impacts of showering (or bathing) every day?

Normal, healthy skin maintains a layer of oil and a balance of “good” bacteria and other microorganisms. Washing and scrubbing removes these, especially if the water is hot. As a result:
  • Skin may become dry, irritated, or itchy.
  • Dry, cracked skin may allow bacteria and allergens to breach the barrier skin is supposed to provide, allowing skin infections and allergic reactions to occur.
  • Antibacterial soaps can actually kill off normal bacteria. This upsets the balance of microorganisms on the skin and encourages the emergence of hardier, less friendly organisms that are more resistant to antibiotics.
  • Our immune systems need a certain amount of stimulation by normal microorganisms, dirt, and other environmental exposures in order to create protective antibodies and “immune memory.” This is one reason why some pediatricians and dermatologists recommend against daily baths for kids. Frequent baths or showers throughout a lifetime may reduce the ability of the immune system to do its job.
And there could be other reasons to lose your enthusiasm for the daily shower: some people suggest that the water with which we clean ourselves may contain salts, heavy metals, chlorine, fluoride, pesticides, and other chemicals. These may cause problems, too.

The case for showering less

Over cleaning your body is probably not a compelling health issue. Yes, you could be making your skin drier than it would be with less frequent showering. This is not a public health menace. However, daily showers do not improve your health, could cause skin problems or other health issues — and, importantly, they waste a lot of water. Also, the oils, perfumes, and other additives in shampoos, conditioners, and soaps may cause problems of their own, such as allergic reactions (not to mention their cost). While there is no ideal frequency, experts suggest that showering several times per week is plenty for most people (unless you are grimy, sweaty, or have other reasons to shower more often). Short showers (lasting three or four minutes) with a focus on the armpits and groin may suffice. If you’re like me, it may be hard to imagine skipping the daily shower. But if you’re doing it for your health, it may be a habit worth breaking.
Robert H. Shmerling, MD Harvard Health Publishing JUNE 26, 2019 https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/showering-daily-is-it-necessary-2019062617193

Installation on the Lanikai Shower System is made easier with 3D interactive instructions on the BILT App. Check out this video to get a sneak peak of how it works, and if you try it, make sure to share on social media. Tag us and use the #ShareMyPulse hashtag. https://biltcorp.app.box.com/s/p97gn3e9rmj84rkmuxdvg97d5nc3438h

With plenty of time and nowhere to go, I’m not sure if I should be showering constantly or not at all.

During quarantine, there are no rules. You can have a meeting with your coworkers while pantsless. You can eat a box of Cheez-Its for breakfast. You can recreate the entire theatrical production of Jesus Christ Superstar with cardboard puppets made out of said Cheez-It boxes. Basically, you don’t have to adhere to most of the usual societal norms that help convince people you’re a regular human. Showering is one of those norms. 

Right now, no one is gonna make you shower. And if you’re not exercising or going outside, you might find that you don’t need to shower as often as you might have before the coronavirus pandemic. Then again, what else is there to do? At least showering is a constructive activity that tricks us into a fleeting sense of normalcy. 

I, for one, am showering more often than usual. Not only do I have time for quick exercise videos on YouTube, but I also have time in the shower to shave my legs, exfoliate, deep condition my hair and whatever other more luxurious steps I might skip in my ordinarily utilitarian cleansing routine. Turns out showering is kind of nice when you’ve got nowhere to be! 

But that’s all just for fun. Is there any practical reasoning to determine the right number of showers to be taking right now? I’m supposed to be washing my hands more often –– does that same rule apply to my extended body?

First things first, you can’t get coronavirus if you (and those who live with you) aren’t going outside. Plain and simple. Showering is optional in that regard. If you have to leave your home, that changes things a bit. According to the World Health Organization, hot showers or baths won’t do anything to help prevent you from getting COVID-19 — there’s been some speculation that hot showers boost immunity or raise your body temperature in a way that kills bacteria, but that’s not true, so there’s no coronavirus-related need to shower before leaving the home. 

Showering when you get home, however, is a good idea. Showering with soap and water will remove the bacteria from your skin in the same way washing your hands would. The virus can only be transmitted via your eyes, nose and mouth — you won’t get sick if, say, your knee touches a surface with the virus on it. But if you touch your knee and then touch your nose, you might get sick. Regardless of whether or not you’re a pro at not touching your face, you probably just don’t want any chance of carrying the virus around, and getting all soapy will help prevent that. MIT Technology Review recommends that you rinse off after every outing, and ditto for your kids. They also recommend washing your clothes or leaving coats and shoes out in the sun after every outing, too. 

But what about showering for other aspects of your health? Showering too often, especially with strong soaps and hot water, can dry out your skin. Not only can dry skin be painful and itchy, it can also trigger flare-ups of skin conditions like psoriasis or eczema. Not showering enough can have similar effects and lead to ailments like dermatitis neglecta, caused by a buildup of dead skin cells. This typically takes more than a week of not bathing, though. It’s ultimately up to you (and perhaps those you share space with) how often you should shower to keep your skin comfortable — this is usually somewhere between once a day to two or three times a week. It’s really a matter of preference and how active you are: If you feel the need to shower multiple times a day, that’s on you. The more often you shower, though, the shorter and less hot they should be for the sake of your skin. 

But if there were ever a time to experiment with getting that water bill down, it’s now. You might even find that your hair and skin look better with fewer showers. Remember, no one can smell you through a webcam.

By Danielle Dresden
https://melmagazine.com/en-us/story/how-often-should-you-shower-coronavirus-quarantine

After existing on this planet for a good couple of decades or longer, you may not realize that you have been showering all wrong. You’ve probably got a routine that you follow whenever you step into the shower, but there are things you should never do in the shower that you should be aware of.

Life is all about learning, especially when it comes to looking after yourself and metamorphosing from a whipper-snapper to a fully-fledged adult. Even though you may still feel eighteen on the inside, you’re not getting any younger and it’s always useful to know how to do things properly. Of course, some folks are better at certain things than others, but when it comes to personal hygiene, there are certain guidelines that will benefit everyone.

Depending on your upbringing, you may or may not have had the semi-embarrassing chat about how to efficiently wash your bod with a parent or guardian. If you didn’t ever get round to this conversation — lucky you — you may have missed out on some vital snippets of info. Chances are, you’re probably bathing just fine (unless you stink to high heaven) but it doesn’t hurt to have some tips up your sleeve on things you should never do in the shower. So, I spoke with an aesthetician, a dermatologist, and a hairstylist to discover the bad bathing habits we should put a stop to pronto.

1. Use Piping Hot Water

I spoke with Stalina Glot, a Senior Aesthetician at Haven Spa NYC, about things you should never do in the shower. Glot says not to take hot showers, due to the fact that they remove too many of your natural oils.

Dr. Hadley King, dermatologist at NYC’s SKINNEY Medspa, also tells me over email, “Water that is too hot can strip the skin of its natural oils and hydration and leave the skin too dry.” Instead she recommends people to, “Use water that is warm instead of hot.”

2. Shower For Too Long

It can be more than tempting to stay in the shower for just a few extra minutes, especially when it’s cold outside. However, Glot warns that you shouldn’t shower for too long, as it can make your skin dry and itchy. Dr. King seconds this, saying, “Don’t shower more than once per day or for more than 8 minutes at a time.” As someone who adores long showers, I feel your pain, but quick showers are better for your skin.

3. Use A Scrub In The Shower Stream

IMO, it’s super frustrating when you lather up your hands with a scrub and just when you’re ready to start applying it to your bod, it washes off your hands and runs down the drain. Glot says, “Don’t use a scrub in the stream of a shower: Water runs on the face [and] body and washes [the] scrub away before anything beneficial can happen.”

4. Over-Use Loofahs

If you’re a loofah lover, you’ll want to know what Glot has to say about these unusual sponges, “They are great for exfoliating but loofahs are also loaded with germs.” Glot advises, “Don’t over use your loofahs.”

5. Put Shampoo On Partially Wet Hair

When it comes to hair care in the shower, Judy McGuinness, Senior Stylist at Mizu New York, has some helpful advice. McGuinness tells me over email, “Make sure your hair is fully drenched in water before lathering up! If your hair isn’t completely wet, the shampoo won’t lather properly, and you’ll end up using more than you need…” She elaborates, “This is especially important for sulfate-free shampoo, as there isn’t any detergent in the formula to help it foam up.”

6. Shave Your Legs On The Day Of A Pedicure

Dr. King tells me, “Don’t shave your legs when you shower on a day you are going to go for a pedicure.” She explains, “It increases the risk of infection.” If you’re a lady who likes to have silky pins, make sure you shave at least the day before your pedicure appointment, so you don’t put yourself at risk of infection.

7. Use Oily Products In The Shower

Although this may seem like common sense, it’s something you might end up doing once, then never repeating again, due to injuring yourself. Glot says, “Don’t use an oily product in the shower. It make the floor dangerously slippery.” Don’t bother with oily products if you want to avoid potential accidents, because slipping in the shower can lead to disastrous consequences.

So keep your hair and skin in tip-top condition, and stay safe in the shower with this expert advice!

https://www.bustle.com/articles/186539-7-things-you-should-never-do-in-the-shower-according-to-the-experts

September 28, 2016

PULSE ShowerSpas will be at KBIS 2020. The Kitchen & Bath Industry Show (KBIS) is North America’s largest trade show dedicated to all aspects of kitchen and bath design. With the expansive show floor filled with the freshest designs from over 600 leading brands, it is a one-stop shop providing attendees and exhibitors the ultimate destination to network, exchange ideas and build their businesses.

Where: Las Vegas Convention Center, Nevada
When: January 21-23, 2020
Booth #SL3420

Check out the show’s page: https://www.kbis.com

PULSE ShowerSpas Shower Systems Offer Modern Design with Exceptional Water Performance

Watsonville, CA — PULSE ShowerSpas, Inc., a manufacturer of pre-plumbed shower systems, offers one of the most diverse lines of pre-plumbed shower systems on the market today. When it comes to feeling refreshed and invigorated, nothing helps you achieve that state of renewed vitality quite like a PULSE ShowerSpa.

The PULSE ShowersSpas AquaPower Shower System, PowerShot Shower System and PowerShot Showerhead provide unmatched performance and innovative technology for those that prefer a 3-function showerhead (waterfall, rain showerhead, and PowerShot).

AquaPower Shower System

PULSE ShowerSpas AquaPower Shower System

The design and style of the AquaPower Shower System gives your bathroom a fresh and modern look by simply replacing your showerhead. Equipped with our exclusive PULSE AquaPower Spray and a showerhead with air infusion technology to enhance your shower experience.  A 3-function handshower with magnetic technology to allow for easy return to the handshower holder.

PowerShot Shower System

PULSE ShowerSpas PowerShot Shower System

The unique design and style of the PowerShot Shower System gives your bathroom a fresh and modern look by simply replacing your showerhead. Equipped with a 3-function showerhead and a 3-function handshower. The easy 3-step drill-less installation makes it the perfect way to upgrade your shower.

PowerShot Showerhead

PULSE ShowerSpas PowerShot Showerhead

The unique design and style of the PowerShot Showerhead gives your bathroom a fresh and modern look by simply replacing your showerhead. The easy 2-step drill-less installation makes it the perfect way to give your shower a quick upgrade. The PowerShot Showerhead works with any standard shower arm. *Shower arm NOT included.

About PULSE ShowerSpas, Inc.
PULSE ShowerSpas, Inc. provides quality products, innovative in design and flawless in function at an affordable price. With one of the most diverse lines of pre-plumbed shower systems on the market today, they are dedicated to establishing and more importantly supporting an extensive network of authorized dealers throughout North America that display and sell the company’s unique line of ShowerSpas & accessories.

Link to article
http://www.kb-resource.com/news/pulse-showersspas-shower-systems-offer-modern-design-with-exceptional-water-performance/

In many parts of the world, taking a shower every day tends to be the norm. However, from a strictly medical perspective, it is not necessary for most people to shower this frequently.

Personal hygiene does provide health benefits, and most people do need to shower regularly. In addition to its use for routine washing and grooming, water offers benefits relating to pain relief and treatment in the form of hydrotherapy.

Baths, steam showers, saunas, and other bathing methods can:

  • improve immune function
  • ease muscle aches and pains
  • reduce swelling
  • increase blood flow
  • improve concentration
  • lessen fatigue
  • make it easier to breathe

To a lesser extent, spending time in the shower can have these same effects. Showering cleans the skin and removes dead skin cells to help clear the pores and allow the skin cells to function. It washes away bacteria and other irritants that could cause rashes and other skin problems.

However, the main reason why people shower as much as they do is that it helps them meet social standards of cleanliness and personal appearance. Meeting these standards helps people feel at home in their working and social environments and their bodies.

Showering in different seasons

Shortening shower time to no more than 5–10 minutes reduces the likelihood of dry skin.

In most parts of the United States, winters are colder and dryer, while the summer is hotter and more humid.

These changing environmental conditions affect the ideal showering frequency.

In the winter, cold temperatures and indoor heating both contribute to dry skin. Many dermatologists recommend that individuals change their bathing routines during the winter to protect themselves from dry skin.

The following techniques may help people reduce the likelihood of dry skin:

  • Shortening shower time to no more than 5–10 minutes.
  • Closing the door to the bathroom to capture the steam and increase the humidity.
  • Replacing hot water and soap with warm water and gentle cleansers.
  • Using the smallest amount of cleanser possible to clean the skin.
  • Drying the skin gently after bathing.
  • Applying plenty of an oil-based moisturizing cream or ointment within 3 minutes of showering to trap moisture in the skin.

Showering at different ages

A person’s bathing needs change throughout their life.

Babies

The American Academy of Pediatrics say that the common practice of bathing babies daily is not really necessary. They suggest that the time to start regular full body washes is when infants are crawling around and beginning to eat food.

Children

According to the American Academy of Dermatologists, although daily bathing is safe for children aged 6–11 years, they only need to take a shower every few days.

Once young people hit puberty, how often they need to shower will vary from person to person. Many people suggest that daily showering is necessary at this time.

Teenagers

Many teenagers are very physically active, and showers are a good idea after strenuous sports events or practices, including swimming, working out, and other physical activities.

Older adults

The previously simple act of taking a shower can sometimes become more challenging for older adults.

Older adults may not require a shower every day to maintain the level of cleanliness necessary to protect their skin, ward off infection, and meet general standards of grooming. Taking a shower once or twice a week can often be sufficient to meet these criteria, and people can use warm washcloths in between to stay feeling fresh.

Older adults who can no longer bathe themselves can still maintain their independence by getting help with their daily activities from caregivers.

Showers and work

People who work in unhygienic conditions need to shower at the end of each of their shifts.

The type of work that people do affects how often they need to shower.

People who work at desk jobs and spend most of their time indoors do not have the same bathing needs as those who work with dangerous substances, animals, or in any jobs that people consider to be unhygienic.

Occupations that people may think of as involving “dirty work” include:

  • butcher
  • janitor
  • exterminator
  • miner
  • garbage collector

People who work with corrosive materials, dangerous chemicals, disease agents, and radioactive materials need to shower at the end of each of their shifts.

Horticulturalists, arborists, amateur gardeners, and anyone who spends a significant amount of time outdoors around a variety of plants can reduce their risk of rashes and other skin injuries by showering as soon as they come indoors. Doing this will help limit their exposure to plant sap, pollens, and other potential allergens, thus reducing the risk of a reaction.

A Dutch study found that showers can reduce sick days at work, but only if they are cold showers. The researchers reported that individuals who ended their showers with at least a 30-second blast of cold water were absent 29 percent less of the time than people who did not do so.

Can you shower too much?

Showering removes bacteria from the skin, which means that it also washes off the bacteria that help the body protect itself from infection.

The soaps and shampoos that people use when showering can dry out the skin and hair, leading to cracked skin and split ends. How rapidly this happens, which affects how often a person should shower, depends on the individual’s skin type, which could be oily or dry, and the climate in which they live.

If people find that their skin feels tight after they step out of the shower, this is not a sign of being clean. Instead, it indicates that the skin is too dry.

In studies focused on hand washing, researchers found that nurses with skin damage on their hands due to frequent washing and wearing gloves harbored more infectious agents than other nurses. The researchers concluded that when the frequency of washing leads to skin damage, it is counterproductive.

Showering also has a significant effect on the environment. Soaps and shampoos, not to mention added ingredients such as microbeads in some skin care products, can make their way into groundwater, lakes, streams, and oceans. The simple act of showering depletes the vital resources of freshwater.

Takeaway

Although showering offers physical, mental, and emotional benefits, the daily shower that many people in the U.S. are in the habit of taking is probably more than most people need. Showering dries out the skin and hair, uses natural resources, and creates an additional source of water pollution.

Trying to determine how often to shower depends on finding the right balance between using natural resources respectfully and what makes a person feel good and clean and fits with their schedule.

The medical recommendation to meet basic physical and health needs is to shower once or twice a week. People working in certain types of job and those who do lots of exercise are likely to need to shower more often.

By Danielle Dresden
Last reviewed Tue 12 March 2019
Reviewed by J. Keith Fisher, M.D.
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324682.php

Taking a shower may be a quick and simple activity or it may be a spa-like indulgence. Most of us rely on showering in order to feel our cleanest and freshest, but many of us don’t know fun facts about showering.

If you want to learn some interesting, shower-related facts, be sure to read our list.

1) Showers are Fairly Lengthy – People in the USA shower for thirteen minutes on average. They would like to spend more time in the shower, just relaxing, but usually don’t, perhaps because of busy schedules or concerns about wasting water. While thirteen minutes is a fairly long time, it’s safe to say that most people step out of the shower a little sooner than they’d like to.

2) Morning Showers are Common – Of course, this fact may not be that surprising. The truth is that most people shower in the morning, probably because they need to get clean before they head out to work. Current statistics show that fifty-eight percent of people take their showers in the morning. Lots of people shower later in the day, too, but the bulk of showering happens earlier, rather than later. Showering is a great way to wake up and start the day fresh!

3) People Wash Their Hair A Lot– People wash their hair 5.7 times every week. This means that most people choose to shampoo every time that they have a shower. They might skip a day, on Sunday for example, but they definitely make shampooing a part of their shower experiences most of the time. This interest in hair care helps to fuel the billion-dollar health and beauty industry!

4) People Get Pensive in the Shower – Since the shower is such a great place to relax and unwind, it makes sense that a lot of people do their best daydreaming while they are under the gentle spray. In fact, sixty-seven percent of people use their shower time to reflect, dream and plan. Showering is definitely therapeutic and it’s a good way to ponder the past, present and future!

5) People Like to Croon While They Get Clean – If you enjoy singing, there’s a sixty-three percent chance that you do some crooning in the shower. Lots of people love to sing songs as they soap up, probably because they shower is a private place to emote and to go for those hard-to-reach high notes! Singing is also a form of therapy, so never be ashamed of singing in the shower. It’s a great way to express yourself and to de-stress!

6) Women May Worry in the Shower – Many women wear a lot of hats in life. This means that they nurture others, while also taking care of any array of career and home-related tasks. For this reason, women are sixteen percent more likely to ruminate over problems and things that they need to do while they get clean. If you’re a woman and you use your shower time to think about all that you need to do, or to ponder problems in relationships, it may be time to clear your mind instead! Daydreaming or singing may help you to manage stress more effectively and to use your downtime to better effect.

7) Showering Isn’t Always a Solo Activity – People who have partners tend to be quite open about sharing their shower time with their significant others. Statistics show that seventy-three percent of men and women have partners around while they shower, shower with their partners or otherwise share their shower spaces with other people.

8) People Step Out of the Shower to Dry Themselves – While some people may towel off while they’re in the shower, after they’ve turned off the water, most vastly prefer to get dry outside of the shower stall. It’s possible that people want more space while they’re drying off, or simply associate the shower stall area with being wet. Whether your bathroom in tiny or huge, you likely step out and grab a towel, like most other people do.

9) Men Don’t Clean Shower Stalls as Much – Women who share shower spaces with guys tend to have issues which relate to their partners or male family members failing to clean their showers after usage. In fact, forty-five percent of ladies find that men don’t pull their weight in terms of cleaning showers! If you’re a guy and you haven’t been doing your share of the cleaning, it may be time to take the pressure off of her by doing a little scrubbing, rinsing and polishing.

10) Most People Wish for Bigger Showers – In the age of HGTV, we see dream homes on a regular basis and these typically have huge and glamorous shower stalls. In real life, most people don’t have these luxurious and roomy shower spaces…but they wish that they did. Forty-eight percent of people who own their own homes wish that their shower stalls were larger. A home renovation will be the best way to enjoy the ultimate shower experience.

How to Enhance Your Shower Experience

Now that you know ten fun facts about showering, you’ll see how your own shower experience compares to that of other Americans.

If you want more from every shower, consider choosing a brand-new shower head with exciting and practical features. For example, some modern shower heads offer a true spa experience, by providing different settings, from massage spray to gentle “rainfall”. It’s possible to change your mood and enhance your well-being just by choosing the perfect setting.

Also, making your bathroom more beautiful and functional may help you to enjoy showers which are more decadent and pleasurable and less workmanlike.

Energy-efficient shower heads will also help you to enjoy long showers without wasting too much water. These days, a lot of manufacturers make shower heads which provide awesome shower experiences, while also maximizing energy efficiency. There are tons of styles to choose from at an array of price points.


https://showerremedy.com/10-fun-facts-about-showering-you-probably-didnt-know/